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History of "Private Tour of Communist Era Prague"

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Version 11 – August 21, 2020 10:17

Description
  • On your Private Tour of Communist Era Prague, delve into Prague’s lesser-known corners to seek out telltale reminders of the city’s 41 years under communist rule (1948-1989). You will:
  • Begin your private tour at the Prague Metronome - built on the site where a statue of Stalin used to loom over the city.Learn about the counterculture and subversion under the communist regime.Hear tales of underground nuclear bunkers and other seemingly apocalyptic markers throughout the city.Learn about the surveillance techniques of the Czech Secret Police See key Communist-era buildings, monuments and memorials, including the Municipal House. Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which stood as the city’s focal point for rallies and protests and the 1989 fall of communism.Begin your tour on the slopes of Letná Park, a 23-metre metronome created in 1991 by Czech designer Vratislav Novák. Locals claim the metronome - which often doesn’t work - symbolises the country’s move away from socialism towards an uncertain future. Continue your tour as you cross the Vltava River into the Jewish Quarter, where anti-semitism took on new fervor under the communist regime. Learn about the unique and decades-long persecution of the Jewish community as you walk through the area.
  • On your private tour, you will learn about the interrogation of ordinary working-class citizens and the oppression of any so-called enemies. Learn how Prague’s intelligentsia were forced into menial jobs and dissidents tortured for subversion. Pass Prague’s most prominent Art Nouveau building, Municipal House, where Czechoslovakia as an independent state was proclaimed.
  • Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which is synonymous with the Czech mass rallies that is synonymous with Czech mass rallies. pause by a simple bronze cross paying homage to Jan Palach and Jan Zajíc. Palach set himself on fire in protest, making headline global news - a story that intensified when fellow student Jan Zajíc also set himself ablaze. Fascinating, and harrowing at times, this fully immersive experience provides rich historical and social context.
  • On your Private Tour of Communist Era Prague, delve into Prague’s lesser-known corners to seek out telltale reminders of the city’s 41 years under communist rule (1948-1989). You will:Begin your private tour at the Prague Metronome - built on the site where a statue of Stalin used to loom over the city.Learn about the counterculture and subversion under the communist regime.Hear tales of underground nuclear bunkers and other seemingly apocalyptic markers throughout the city.Learn about the surveillance techniques of the Czech Secret Police See key Communist-era buildings, monuments and memorials, including the Municipal House. Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which stood as the city’s focal point for rallies and protests and the 1989 fall of communism.Begin your tour on the slopes of Letná Park, a 23-metre metronome created in 1991 by Czech designer Vratislav Novák. Locals claim the metronome - which often doesn’t work - symbolises the country’s move away from socialism towards an uncertain future. Continue your tour as you cross the Vltava River into the Jewish Quarter, where anti-semitism took on new fervor under the communist regime. Learn about the unique and decades-long persecution of the Jewish community as you walk through the area.On your private tour, you will learn about the interrogation of ordinary working-class citizens and the oppression of any so-called enemies. Learn how Prague’s intelligentsia were forced into menial jobs and dissidents tortured for subversion. Pass Prague’s most prominent Art Nouveau building, Municipal House, where Czechoslovakia as an independent state was proclaimed.Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which is synonymous with the Czech mass rallies that is synonymous with Czech mass rallies. pause by a simple bronze cross paying homage to Jan Palach and Jan Zajíc. Palach set himself on fire in protest, making headline global news - a story that intensified when fellow student Jan Zajíc also set himself ablaze. Fascinating, and harrowing at times, this fully immersive experience provides rich historical and social context.
Full Description
Additional Info
  • Not wheelchair accessible

Version 2 – June 22, 2020 08:37

Know Before You Go
  • Please ensure you arrive at the meeting point 10 minutes prior to the tour start time
  • Please bring waterproof clothing incase it rains
  • In summer, please remember to bring a hat, sunscreen and appropriate clothing
Know Before You Book
  • Please bring comfortable walking shoes
  • Kids under 4 go free

Version 1 – June 22, 2020 08:03

Description Summary
  • Explore Prague's mid-twentieth century history on this private walking tour.
  • Explore Prague's mid-twentieth century history on this private walking tour.
Description
  • On your Private Tour of Communist Era Prague, delve into Prague’s lesser-known corners to seek out telltale reminders of the city’s 41 years under communist rule (1948-1989). You will:Begin your private tour at the Prague Metronome - built on the site where a statue of Stalin used to loom over the city.Learn about the counterculture and subversion under the communist regime.Hear tales of underground nuclear bunkers and other seemingly apocalyptic markers throughout the city.Learn about the surveillance techniques of the Czech Secret Police See key Communist-era buildings, monuments and memorials, including the Municipal House. Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which stood as the city’s focal point for rallies and protests and the 1989 fall of communism.Begin your tour on the slopes of Letná Park, a 23-metre metronome created in 1991 by Czech designer Vratislav Novák. Locals claim the metronome - which often doesn’t work - symbolises the country’s move away from socialism towards an uncertain future. Continue your tour as you cross the Vltava River into the Jewish Quarter, where anti-semitism took on new fervor under the communist regime. Learn about the unique and decades-long persecution of the Jewish community as you walk through the area.On your private tour, you will learn about the interrogation of ordinary working-class citizens and the oppression of any so-called enemies. Learn how Prague’s intelligentsia were forced into menial jobs and dissidents tortured for subversion. Pass Prague’s most prominent Art Nouveau building, Municipal House, where Czechoslovakia as an independent state was proclaimed.Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which is synonymous with the Czech mass rallies that is synonymous with Czech mass rallies. pause by a simple bronze cross paying homage to Jan Palach and Jan Zajíc. Palach set himself on fire in protest, making headline global news - a story that intensified when fellow student Jan Zajíc also set himself ablaze. Fascinating, and harrowing at times, this fully immersive experience provides rich historical and social context.
  • On your Private Tour of Communist Era Prague, delve into Prague’s lesser-known corners to seek out telltale reminders of the city’s 41 years under communist rule (1948-1989). You will:Begin your private tour at the Prague Metronome - built on the site where a statue of Stalin used to loom over the city.Learn about the counterculture and subversion under the communist regime.Hear tales of underground nuclear bunkers and other seemingly apocalyptic markers throughout the city.Learn about the surveillance techniques of the Czech Secret Police See key Communist-era buildings, monuments and memorials, including the Municipal House. Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which stood as the city’s focal point for rallies and protests and the 1989 fall of communism.Begin your tour on the slopes of Letná Park, a 23-metre metronome created in 1991 by Czech designer Vratislav Novák. Locals claim the metronome - which often doesn’t work - symbolises the country’s move away from socialism towards an uncertain future. Continue your tour as you cross the Vltava River into the Jewish Quarter, where anti-semitism took on new fervor under the communist regime. Learn about the unique and decades-long persecution of the Jewish community as you walk through the area.On your private tour, you will learn about the interrogation of ordinary working-class citizens and the oppression of any so-called enemies. Learn how Prague’s intelligentsia were forced into menial jobs and dissidents tortured for subversion. Pass Prague’s most prominent Art Nouveau building, Municipal House, where Czechoslovakia as an independent state was proclaimed.Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square, which is synonymous with the Czech mass rallies that is synonymous with Czech mass rallies. pause by a simple bronze cross paying homage to Jan Palach and Jan Zajíc. Palach set himself on fire in protest, making headline global news - a story that intensified when fellow student Jan Zajíc also set himself ablaze. Fascinating, and harrowing at times, this fully immersive experience provides rich historical and social context.
Highlights
  • Begin your private tour at the Prague Metronome
  • Learn about the counterculture and subversion under the communist regime
  • Hear tales of underground nuclear bunkers and other seemingly apocalyptic markers throughout the city
  • Learn about the surveillance techniques of the Czech Secret Police
  • See key Communist-era buildings, monuments and memorials, including the Municipal House
  • Finish your tour in Wenceslas Square
Included
  • A friendly, professional tour guide for your own private group
  • Plenty of time to take photos of your favourite places.
Excluded
  • Lunch, although your guide will recommend a delicious local restaurant along the way
Cancellation Notes
  • Up to 24 hours before the beginning of the activity: full refund
  • Less than 24 hours before the beginning of the activity or no-show: no refund
  • Up to 24 hours before the beginning of the activity: full refund
  • Less than 24 hours before the beginning of the activity or no-show: no refund